I can’t hate Christmas.

My mother was one of those painfully optimistic, glass half full kinda people. She could lose a limb and a minute later would immediately comment on how she has three others. I tried to channel that for years. I succeeded for many actually. A few weeks ago as my colleagues were discussing Christmas and I felt bitter. The kind of bitterness you can feel churning in your stomach. It is a disgusting feeling, one my mother would never approve of. You see, on Christmas day last year my gorgeous mother lost her battle to Cystic Fibrosis and on that day I vowed to forget Christmas. My mother loved Christmas cheer. She loved being inside under a fluffy blanket as the frost covered the road outside, she loved the hot drinks while she read her favourite book and the twinkling of the Christmas lights late at night. I loved all of those things too. She loved the streets of NYC on Christmas eve and battling her way through Macy’s to get to the toy section.

Last night I sat down with my dogs and a mug of tea from my mum’s favourite mug. Outside the moonlight hit the frost to create this glittery sheen. The beauty of it hit me hard. What am I doing? I love Christmas. She loved Christmas. Do I want to become one of those people who spends their life avoiding something beautiful because it hurt me once before? That is like vowing never to love again once you have had your heart broken. I don’t want to be that person and my mum would never be that person. Someone told me recently it takes nothing to forgive and forget but it takes constant effort to feel bitter every day. That resonated with me. I don’t want to feel bitter about Christmas. I want to laugh, I want to enjoy, I want to experience like my mum would want me to. I want to stick out my tongue in Time’s Square to catch snowflakes. I want to (badly) sing along to cheery Christmas tunes. I want to be what she was. I want her ridiculous optimism. I want her. That’s not going to happen so this is the next best thing. Because, the thing about my mum was. She suffered. Damn, she really suffered, but you know what? She might just have been the happiest person I had ever known. She was warm and fuzzy. She was a warm hug. She was a shelter in the pouring rain. She was home.

 

I want that.

One day, I want someone to say that I was the painfully optimistic, happy lunatic they admired.

For now, maybe I will hang those Christmas stockings. All three of them.

 

‘ It’s too cold outside for angels to fly’.

 

 

-Christina.

 

3 comments

  1. Kerry · November 26, 2016

    Beautiful Christina, that’s right luv your mummy would want you to celebrate after all it is the birthday of Jesus a special day for special people we will always remember Alio with a smile on our faces xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  2. caroline · November 27, 2016

    i know how you feel love my mum past away on the 17th dec 2014. i felt same way. and 9 weeks ago i lost my hero my we bro. but i will continue christmas for my grandkids. miss them so much but they loved christmas .so ill try enjoy. hope you have a lovely xmas christina

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Janet Wilkins · January 18, 2017

    Only just read this. I hope your first Christmas without your lovely Mum was better than you expected. It will get better. In some ways it helps if you have a special time to remember the good things. I lost my mum on Christmas Day 2003.

    Liked by 1 person

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